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The largest city in the Simcoe County region, Barrie can be found along the western shore of Lake Simcoe in the northern section of the Golden Horseshoe. Now home to a population exceeding 136 000 people – mostly Canadian citizens – it was named in 1833 for Sir Robert Barrie, Commander of the Canadian naval forces.

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Once known as The Flower Town of Canada thanks to a large greenhouse industry, Brampton is a city within Southern Ontario that plays home to a population of over 500 000 residents. Named for a market town in England, it has experienced several large population booms and plenty of urban sprawl over the last 20 years as development has continued north of the Caledonian border.

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Outsiders may know Burlington best as the home of Canada’s Largest Ribfest, but this city of almost 200000 residents is also a bustling hive of industrial and economic activity thanks largely to its geography.

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Settled by European settlers in the late eighteenth century, the area now known as Etobicoke was once home to several small villages and towns that grew into each other and eventually developed into a larger community. Bordered by Lake Ontario, the Humber River, and Etobicoke Creek, the area is now home to a diverse population of almost 350 000 immigrants from around the world.

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Named by John Graves Simcoe for his friend and then Archbishop of York William Markham, this city is now the fourth largest in the Greater Toronto Area and continues to grow at a rate almost three times that of the national growth rate.

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One of the largest communities on in the Great Lakes region, Mississauga often plays second fiddle to the bigger boys on the playground, namely Toronto and Chicago, but residents of the area know it is a vibrant and diverse community well deserving of its title of best ‘mid-sized city of the future’ from fDi Magazine.

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Located in arguably the most fertile and beautiful region of Southern Ontario, the Niagara region is perhaps best known for its world-class wineries. Also home to a wide variety of local theatre groups, antique shops, museums, gardens, golf courses, and galleries, this area includes the falls themselves and the small town of Niagara-on-the-Lake.

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Known as the City with Heart, North York is a former municipality of Toronto and, until 1998, was the second-largest such municipality in the area. One of the most diverse areas of the city, it includes the central northern section of the city and is home to a culturally and economically diverse population of over 635 000 residents.

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Nestled along the shores of Lake Ontario, Oakville is a charming town with a strong sense of community and history. Since 1857, this region has been an extremely popular destination for home- and business-owners alike thanks to safe neighborhoods, great schools, and easy access to many major highways as well as GO public transit.

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With over 544 hectares of undeveloped land and 166 parks, Richmond Hill is quite possible one of the greenest areas of the city. The city is home to The Richmond Green Sports Centre and Park, which is the largest in the area and features baseball diamonds, skating rinks, a skateboard park, and an amphitheater for live entertainment.

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Once a major lumber center, Sudbury was actually founded thanks to a chance discovery of nickel ore in 1883 by Tom Flanagan, a blacksmith for the Canadian Pacific Railway. The region quickly emerged as a world leader in nickel mining and remains a profitable area.

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Divided between two separate communities, Vaughan to the west and Markham to the east, Thornhill is a region of suburban diversity. Located in the Greater Toronto Area, it was once a municipal village located along the northern border of the city of Toronto. Now home to an ethnically diverse population of over 110 000 people, it was originally founded in 1794.

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In Southern Ontario at the heart of the Golden Horseshoe lies the largest Canadian city: Toronto. Located along the northern shores of Lake Ontario, this provincial capital was established in the late 18th century when the British Crown purchased the land from the Mississaugas of the New Credit.

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An area of incredible growth, Vaughan, Ontario has all but doubled in size over the past 20-25 years and now ranks as one of the five largest cities in the Greater Toronto Area. Divided into six traditional communities – Woodbridge, Maple, Thornhill, Concord, Kleinburg, and the Vaughan Metropolitan Centre – it is located in York Region, north of the city of Toronto.

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